The 3 Best Car Mods Available According to Grads of Auto Service School

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Most people aren’t going to bother modifying their cars. They’ll go out, find a model they like, and keep it looking pretty much the same for as long as they own it. Others, though, are a little more adventurous. They see the appeal in making little tweaks to boost performance or achieve an incredible new look. Needless to say, it’s this second kind of person that gets auto pros excited to go into work every day.

Working as an auto service advisor can give you fantastic insight into car performance and modification, so it’s no surprise that there are a few mods out there that are particularly prized by the industry. Curious about what those are? Here are some of the best examples.

Cold Air Intakes Help Cars Breathe Better and Work Better

Driving a car with a factory air filter is a little like trying to run a marathon when you have a cold: at the very least, your performance is going to be a bit reduced. Like people, cars need their oxygen in order to move about, and regular air filters just aren’t the most efficient set of lungs.

A cold air intake, on the other hand, places the air filter outside of the engine compartment, where it can draw in cooler, more oxygen-dense air. They also tend to have more and smoother airflow. Combined, these attributes can lead to better fuel burn, with associated benefits of more power and greater fuel efficiency.

Perhaps best of all, cold air intake systems are fairly inexpensive mods. Graduates of auto service programs can expect to sell these parts to clients for just a couple hundred dollars—not a bad value for people looking to buy into better auto performance.

Grads of Auto Service Programs Know Adjustable Sway Bars Make for a More Pleasant Drive

Sway bars, also known as “anti-roll bars,” are becoming relatively common among large and performance vehicles, and with good reason. This part connects both sides of the car’s suspension together, reducing the amount that the body rolls during turns. The result is usually greater traction and a tighter, safer handling experience for the driver.

This type of part seems to be having a moment in the sun, so you might see a few of these modifications after completing auto service school. It’s worth noting that the benefits don’t extend only to large and luxury vehicles—the physics will work for pretty much anything on four wheels—so the market is massive for this type of mod.

For the Simplest, Best Mod, Grads of Auto Service School Recommend New Tires

Tires are far from glamorous, but auto pros know they should be the starting point for people looking to take their car to the next level; stock tires just aren’t that great much of the time.

What should car owners look for? Wider tires offer better traction, so much of the time the goal is to go as wide as possible, within legal or safety limits. This can come with some decent benefits to performance, fuel efficiency, and even safety. Additionally, quality rubber is a necessity for achieving great grip on the roads, and that means different things in different seasons. For all-season tires, firmer rubber will give the best traction—and therefore best performance—on roads. In the winter, a softer rubber is necessary to achieve adequate grip on snow and ice.

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For best performance, modders should invest in two sets of quality tires for handling different seasons

It might be pricey to invest in two quality sets of tires, but it’s worth stressing to clients the benefits that come with doing so. If a client is serious enough about performance to go out seeking mods of any kind, they really should make sure they spend their money on the mods that offer the biggest benefits.

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Categories: ATC News, Surrey
Tags: auto service programs, auto service school, careers in the auto industry

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